NISAD

How to get back on track when you feel like you failed

Reading Time: 3 minutes
On June 17, 2020
How to get back on track when you feel like you failed

We’ve all been there.

The couple of biscuits, which quickly turns into the rest of the packet.
The day we just don’t feel like doing much so decide to ditch any thoughts of fresh air and exercise and stay inside where it’s warm and cosy.
Plans of enjoying our favourite tipple in moderation that swiftly go out the window after a busy day.

We all have days when our best intentions go awry. And that’s OK.

It’s what we do afterwards that matters…

Does finishing off a packet of biscuits mean we give up on our intention of eating healthily most of the time? That we might as well stuff our face at every opportunity and resign ourselves to being bigger than we want to be?

Does missing a chance to get some exercise mean we might as well give up on our hopes of being more active? That it’s impossible to get fitter and healthier because we really can’t bear moving from the couch today?

Does over-indulging ourselves with our favourite drink mean we‘re doomed to go all out on whatever we fancy because we have no willpower? That we’re just the kind of person that doesn’t know how to stop?

OR

Is devouring a packet of biscuits, missing a chance at exercise or over-indulging with our favourite drink JUST ONE MOMENT IN TIME. One moment in time that has no bearing on what we choose to do next.

Each day is a new day
Each moment is a new moment
Where we have a new choice.

So if we’ve devoured a packet of biscuits, we can forgive ourselves. The next moment is a new moment where we can have different thoughts, different feelings, different choices.

If we’ve forgone the exercise for the comfort of home, we can appreciate having had that feeling of being comforted and cosy when we really wanted it. Tomorrow will be a new day where we can feel rested and ready to stretch our legs.

If we’ve over-indulged with one thing, we can notice this, without judgement, and be curious about what we might do differently in the next moment.

As we begin changing our habits around food, exercise and drink, it’s important to recognise that things may not always go in a smooth line.

There may be blips along the way that momentarily knock us off course. Rather than letting those blips derail us, we can choose to pick ourselves up and get back on track to being healthier, fitter, happier.

And it’s nice to know that each time you navigate a blip and keep going, you’re becoming more resilient.

Alison Easton

Alison Easton

Director of Clinical and Creative Development

BA(Hons) HPD DipCHyp

NoWeigh Programme

The NoWeigh programme has been developed by biomedical scientists and psychological health professionals.
The programme will help you change the behaviours that are keeping you larger than you want to be – but it’s not about telling you what to eat or drink, or how much to exercise.
Many of our behaviours are automatic, habitual and influenced by our emotions. In order to change the effect our emotions have on us and to become more aware of the things we do habitually and automatically, we need to understand at a deeper level how our mind and body works.
The programme recognises that you are an individual with your very own behaviours, emotional needs and physical make-up.
Our biomedical scientists will assess your key hormones related to body fat reduction. Our clinical therapists will work with you to address your individual needs and challenges. We focus our outcomes on body-fat reduction as this is a much more reliable measure than weight or BMI, despite what you may have been told in the past.
Commercial diets are an ‘outside job’; they focus on things that are external to us like what we eat and drink and how much we exercise.
The NoWeigh programme is an ‘inside job’; it focuses on what you think, feel and believe and how that makes you behave.
The programme will fundamentally change your relationship with yourself and a ‘side-effect’ of this is that it will fundamentally change your behaviour regarding food, drink and exercise – and once you’ve learned this different way of being you can’t ‘unlearn’ it – and this is what leads to long-term, permanent change.